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Taxon: Prunus salicina Lindl.

 
Genus: Prunus
Subgenus: Prunus
Section: Prunus
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Amygdaloideae
Tribe: Amygdaleae
Nomen number: 30091
Place of publication: Trans. Hort. Soc. London 7:239. 1828 ("1830")
Link to protologue: https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/44594745
Comment: date of publication from K. Gandhi (pers. comm. via e-mail on 11 Jul 2012)
Name Verified on: 13-May-2011 by ARS Systematic Botanists.
Accessions: 211 (79 active, 33 available) in National Plant Germplasm System (Map)

Autonyms (not in current use) and synonyms:

(≡ homotypic synonym, = heterotypic synonym, - autonym)

Common names:

Economic Importance:

  • Human food: fruit; fruit; fruit

Distributional Range:

    Native

    Asia-Temperate
    • CHINA: China [Anhui Sheng, Zhejiang Sheng, Fujian Sheng, Heilongjiang Sheng, Henan Sheng, Hebei Sheng, Hunan Sheng, Hubei Sheng, Gansu Sheng, Jiangxi Sheng, Jiangsu Sheng, Jilin Sheng, Guangdong Sheng, Guizhou Sheng, Liaoning Sheng, Shanxi Sheng, Shandong Sheng, Shaanxi Sheng, Sichuan Sheng, Yunnan Sheng, Guangxi Zhuangzu Zizhiqu, Ningxia Huizi Zizhiqu]
    • EASTERN ASIA: Taiwan

    Asia-Tropical
    • INDO-CHINA: Laos (n.), Myanmar (n.), Vietnam (n.)


    Cultivated (also cult.)

References:

  1. Aldén, B., S. Ryman, & M. Hjertson. 2012. Svensk Kulturväxtdatabas, SKUD (Swedish Cultivated and Utility Plants Database; online resource) URL: www.skud.info
  2. Aubréville, A. et al., eds. 1960-. Flore du Cambodge du Laos et du Viet-Nam.
  3. Boonprakob, U. & D. H. Byrne. 2003. Species composition of Japanese plum founding clones as revealed by RAPD markers. Acta Hort. 622:473-476. Note: this study examined parental origin of American plum cultivars
  4. Bouhadida, M. et al. 2007. Chloroplast DNA diversity in Prunus and its implication on genetic relationships. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 132:670-679. Note: this study included samples of both Prunus salicina and its hybrids used as graft stocks
  5. Chin, S.-W. et al. 2014. Diversification of almonds, peaches, plums and cherries - Molecular systematics and biogeographic history of Prunus (Rosaceae). Molec. Phylogenet. Evol. 76:34-48.
  6. Chinese Academy of Sciences. 1959-. Flora reipublicae popularis sinicae.
  7. Czerepanov, S. K. 1995. Vascular plants of Russia and adjacent states (the former USSR) Cambridge University Press.
  8. Encke, F. et al. 1984. Zander: Handwörterbuch der Pflanzennamen, 13. Auflage
  9. Facciola, S. 1990. Cornucopia, a source book of edible plants Kampong Publications.
  10. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 2010. Ecocrop (on-line resource). URL: http://ecocrop.fao.org/ecocrop/srv/en/cropListDetails?code=&relation=beginsWith&name=Prunus+salicina&quantity=1 target='_blank'
  11. Fu, Y. C. et al. 1977-. Flora intramongolica.
  12. Ghora, C. & G. Panigrahi. 1984. Rosaceae: genus Prunus. Fascicles of flora of India. 18:9.
  13. Gómez, E. et al. 1993. Volatile compounds in apricot, plum, and their interspecific hybrids. J. Agric. Food Chem. 41:1669-1676. Note: it comments that cultivars of the hybrid are sterile
  14. Groth, D. 2005. pers. comm. Note: re. Brazilian common names
  15. Hancock, J. F. et al. 2008. Chapter 9. Peaches. Temperate fruit crop breeding: germplasm to genomics 265-298.
  16. Hartmann, W. & M. Neumüller. 2009. Plum breeding. Breeding plantation tree crops: temperate species 161-231. Note: this review cited Prunus salicina and P. ussuriensis
  17. Huxley, A., ed. 1992. The new Royal Horticultural Society dictionary of gardening
  18. Iwatsuki, K. et al. 1993-. Flora of Japan.
  19. Komarov, V. L. et al., eds. 1934-1964. Flora SSSR.
  20. Liberty Hyde Bailey Hortorium. 1976. Hortus third.
  21. Liu, W. et al. 2007. Interspecific hybridization of Prunus persica with P. armeniaca and P. salicina using embryo rescue. Pl. Cell Tissue Organ Cult. 88:289-299. Note: this study used embyo rescue techniques to generate hybrids between Prunus persica and P. salicina (as "salicica")
  22. Markle, G. M. et al., eds. 1998. Food and feed crops of the United States, ed. 2
  23. Mehlenbacher, S. A. et al. 1991. Apricots (Prunus). Acta Hort. 290:65-110.
  24. Mun-Chan, B. et al. 1986. A checklist of the Korean cultivated plants. Kulturpflanze 34:120.
  25. Ohwi, J. 1965. Flora of Japan (Engl. ed.).
  26. Okie, W. R. 2001. Plum crazy: Rediscovering our lost Prunus resources. HortScience 36:209-213.
  27. Pandey, A. et al. 2008. Genetic resources of Prunus (Rosaceae) in India. Genet. Resources Crop Evol. 55:91-104. Note: introduced in India, and a minor cultivated resource
  28. Personal Care Products Council. INCI
  29. Porcher, M. H. et al. Searchable World Wide Web Multilingual Multiscript Plant Name Database (MMPND) (on-line resource).
  30. Rahemi, A. et al. 2012. Genetic diversity of some wild almonds and related Prunus species revealed by SSR and EST-SSR molecular markers. Pl. Syst. Evol. 298:173-192.
  31. Ramming, D. W. & V. Cociu. 1991. Plums (Prunus). Acta Hort. 290:235-290. Note: this review mentioned that Prunus salicina "hybridizes easily with P. simonii, P. armeniaca and American plum species"
  32. Randhawa, G. S. 1979. Description of wild species of pome and stone fruits IV. Prunus. Indian J. Hort. 36:148.
  33. Reales, A. et al. 2010. Phylogenetics of Eurasian plums, Prunus L. section Prunus (Rosaceae), according to coding and non-coding chloroplast DNA sequences. Tree Genet. Genomes 6:37-45. Note: this study included diploid samples of Prunus salicina, although this species is known from diploid and tetraploid populations
  34. Rehm, S. 1994. Multilingual dictionary of agronomic plants
  35. Rubio, M. et al. 2005. Evaluation of resistance to sharka (plum pox virus) of several Prunus rootstocks. Pl. Breed. (New York) 124:67-70. Note: this study found that the graft stock hybrid Prunus salicina × P. besseyi (=P. pumila var. besseyi) expressed moderate resistance to the virus
  36. Rubio-Cabetas, M. J. et al. 1996. Fertilisation assessment and postzygotic development in several intra- and interspecific Prunus hybrids. Euphytica 90:325-330. Note: this study evaluated crosses between hybrids, fertilization failed for those involving Prunus cerasifera × P. salicina
  37. Salesses, G. et al. 1988. Creation of plum rootstocks for peach and plum by interspecific hybridization. Acta Hort. 224:339-344. Note: this study examined Prunus salicina × P. spinosa graft stock for peach
  38. Shi, S. et al. 2013. Phylogeny and classification of Prunus sensu lato (Rosaceae). J. Integr. Pl. Biol. 55:1069-1079.
  39. Shimada, T. et al. 1999. Genetic diversity of plums characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Euphytica 109:143-147. Note: Netherlands journal of plant breeding
  40. Sutherland, B. G. et al. 2008. Trans-specific S-RNase and SFB alleles in Prunus self-incompatibility haplotypes. Molec. Genet. Genomics 279:95-106.
  41. Verheij, E. W. M. & R. E. Coronel, eds. 1991. Edible fruits and nuts. Plant Resources of South-East Asia (PROSEA) 2:262.
  42. Vitovskii et al., V. L. 1980. Systematical position of Prunus ussuriensis Koval & Kostina. Trudy Prikl. Bot. 67:58.
  43. Wu Zheng-yi & P. H. Raven et al., eds. 1994-. Flora of China (English edition).

Check other web resources for Prunus salicina Lindl. :

  • Flora of China: Online version from Harvard University
  • TROPICOS: Nomenclatural and Specimen Database of the Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Mansfeld: Mansfeld's World Databas of Agricultural and Horticultural Crops
  • ePIC: Electronic Plant Information Centre of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • AGRICOLA: Article Citation Database or NAL Catalog of USDA's National Agricultural Library
  • Entrez: NCBI's search engine for PubMed citations, GenBank sequences, etc.
  • PubAg: USDA's National Agricultural Library database of full-text journal articles and citations on the agricultural sciences.

Images:

  • Fruit: U.S. National Seed Herbarium image

Cite as: USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Plant Germplasm System. 2019. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN-Taxonomy).
National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. URL: https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?30091. Accessed 21 September 2019.