Taxon: Brassica rapa L. subsp. oleifera (DC.) Metzg.

 
Genus: Brassica
Family: Brassicaceae (alt.Cruciferae)
      Tribe: Brassiceae
Nomen number: 319648
Place of publication: Syst. Beschr. Kohlart. 49. 1833
Comment: [or B. rapa Turnip Rape Group]
Name Verified on: 04-Jun-2010 by ARS Systematic Botanists. Last Changed: 14-May-2012
Species priority site is: North Central Regional PI Station (NC7)
Accessions: 53 in National Plant Germplasm System

Common names:

Economic Importance:

  • Harmful organism host: crop diseases (fide WorldWeeds 123. 1997, as B. campestris)
  • Harmful organism host: crop pests (fide WorldWeeds 123. 1997, as B. campestris)
  • Environmental: soil improver (fide Cover Crop Database, as B. campestris)
  • Human food: oil/fat (fide Mansf Ency)
  • Fuels: potential as petroleum substitute/alcohol (fide http://www.ag.uidaho.edu/brassica/area_of_interest.htm,)
  • Gene sources: disease resistance for rape (fide Pl Dis 87:752. 2003, mentions the commercial use of B. napus carrying a resistant gene from this taxon)
  • Gene sources: primary genetic relative of turnip (fide L Medit based on records of wild populations in Northern Africa)
  • Medicines: folklore (fide CRC MedHerbs ed2)
  • Vertebrate poisons: mammals (fide Cooper & Johnson ed2, as Brassica campestris)
  • Weed: potential seed contaminant (fide WorldWeeds 117. 1997, as B. campestris)

Distributional Range:

    Other:

    . widespread weed, probable origin Eurasia

    Naturalized:

  • Africa

    • Northern Africa: Algeria; Libya; Morocco; Tunisia
    • Southern Africa: South Africa
  • Asia-Temperate

    • Caucasus: Armenia; Azerbaijan; Georgia; Russian Federation - Dagestan; Russian Federation-Ciscaucasia - Ciscaucasia
    • Middle Asia: Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Tajikistan; Turkmenistan; Uzbekistan
    • Mongolia: Mongolia
    • Russian Far East: Russian Federation-Far East - Far East
    • Siberia: Russian Federation-Eastern Siberia - Eastern Siberia; Russian Federation-Western Siberia - Western Siberia
  • Australasia

    • Australia: Australia
    • New Zealand: New Zealand
  • Europe

    • Eastern Europe: Belarus; Estonia; Latvia; Lithuania; Russian Federation-European part - European part; Ukraine
    • Middle Europe: Austria; Belgium; Czech Republic; Germany; Hungary; Netherlands; Poland; Slovakia; Switzerland
    • Northern Europe: Denmark; Finland; Ireland; Norway; Sweden; United Kingdom
    • Southeastern Europe: Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Greece; Italy; Macedonia; Montenegro; Romania; Serbia; Slovenia
    • Southwestern Europe: France; Spain
  • Northern America

    • : Canada; Mexico; United States
  • Pacific

    • North-Central Pacific: United States - Hawaii
    • Southwestern Pacific: New Caledonia
  • Southern America

    • Caribbean: Hispaniola
    • Central America: Nicaragua
    • Southern South America: Argentina; Chile; Paraguay - Alto Paraguay; Uruguay
    • Western South America: Bolivia; Ecuador; Peru

  • Cultivated:

    . widely cult.

    Adventive:

  • Africa

    • East Tropical Africa: Kenya; Tanzania; Uganda
    • Northeast Tropical Africa: Eritrea; Ethiopia
    • South Tropical Africa: Mozambique; Zimbabwe
  • Asia-Tropical

    • Indian Subcontinent: India; Pakistan
  • Southern America

    • Brazil: Brazil
    • Caribbean: Barbados; Guadeloupe; Martinique

References:

  • Botanical Society of the British Isles BSBI taxon database (on-line resource). (BSBI)
  • Cheng, B. F. et al. 2001. Low glucosinolate Brassica juncea breeding line revealed to be nullisomic (Genome) 44:738.
  • Chrungu, B. et al. 1999. Production and characterization of interspecific hybrids between Brassica maurorum and crop brassicas Theor. Appl. Genet. 98:608-613.
  • Chrungu, B. et al. 1999. Production and characterization of interspecific hybrids between Brassica maurorum and crop brassicas Theor. Appl. Genet. 98:608-613.
  • Erhardt, W. et al. Der große Zander: Enzyklopädie der Pflanzennamen. 2008 (Zander Ency)
  • Euro+Med Editorial Committee Euro+Med Plantbase: the information resource for Euro-Mediterranean plant diversity (on-line resource). (EuroMed Plantbase)
  • Garg, H. et al. 2007. Hybridizing Brassica rapa with wild crucifers Diplotaxis erucoides and Brassica maurorum (Euphytica) 156:417-424.
  • Garg, H. et al. 2007. Hybridizing Brassica rapa with wild crucifers Diplotaxis erucoides and Brassica maurorum (Euphytica) 156:417-424.
  • Hanelt, P., ed. Mansfeld's encyclopedia of agricultural and horticultural crops. Volumes 1-6. 2001 (Mansf Ency)
  • Hegi, G. et al. 1986. Illustrierte Flora von Mittel-Europa. ed. 1:1906-1931; ed. 2:1936-68; ed. 3:1966- (IllF MEur) 4(1):457.
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  • Porcher, M. H. et al. Searchable World Wide Web Multilingual Multiscript Plant Name Database (MMPND) (on-line resource). (Pl Names)
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  • Song, K. et al. 1988. Brassica taxonomy based on nuclear restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). 1. Genome evolution of diploid and amphidiploid species Theor. Appl. Genet. 75:784-794.
  • Song, K. et al. 1988. Brassica taxonomy based on nuclear restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). 1. Genome evolution of diploid and amphidiploid species Theor. Appl. Genet. 75:784-794.
  • Song, K. et al. 1988. Brassica taxonomy based on nuclear restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). 2. Preliminary analysis of subspecies within B. rapa (syn. campestris) and B. oleracea Theor. Appl. Genet. 76:593-600.
  • Song, K. et al. 1988. Brassica taxonomy based on nuclear restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). 2. Preliminary analysis of subspecies within B. rapa (syn. campestris) and B. oleracea Theor. Appl. Genet. 76:593-600.
  • Stace, C. New flora of the British Isles. 1995 (F BritStace)
  • Takuno, S. et al. 2010. Assessment of genetic diversity of accessions in Brassicaceae genetic resources by frequency distribution analysis of S haplotypes Theor. Appl. Genet. 120:1129-1138.
  • Takuno, S. et al. 2010. Assessment of genetic diversity of accessions in Brassicaceae genetic resources by frequency distribution analysis of S haplotypes Theor. Appl. Genet. 120:1129-1138.
  • Turrill, W. B. et al., eds. Flora of tropical East Africa. 1952- (F TE Afr)
  • Tutin, T. G. et al., eds. Flora europaea, second edition. 1993 (F Eur ed2)
  • University of Idaho 2010. Brassica breeding and research goals
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  • Young, R. 1996. pers. comm. (pers. comm.)
  • Zhao, J. et al. 2005. Genetic relationships within Brassica rapa as inferred from AFLP fingerprints Theor. Appl. Genet. 110:1301-1314.
  • Zhao, J. et al. 2005. Genetic relationships within Brassica rapa as inferred from AFLP fingerprints Theor. Appl. Genet. 110:1301-1314.

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