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Taxon: Brassica nigra (L.) W. D. J. Koch

 
Genus: Brassica
Family: Brassicaceae (alt.Cruciferae)
Tribe: Brassiceae
Nomen number: 7666
Place of publication: J. C. Röing, Deutschl. Fl. ed. 3, 4:713. 1833
Link to protologue:
Comment: valid publication verified from original literature
Name Verified on: 02-May-2010 by ARS Systematic Botanists.
Accessions: 164 (99 active, 90 available) in National Plant Germplasm System (Map)

Autonyms (not in current use) and synonyms:

(≡ homotypic synonym, = heterotypic synonym, - autonym)

Common names:

  • black mustard  (Source: World Econ Pl) - English
  • khardal  (Source: F Egypt) - Arabic
  • black mustard   - English (Canada)
  • moutarde noire  (Source: Dict Rehm) - French
  • moutarde noire    - French (Canada)
  • schwarzer Senf  (Source: Dict Rehm) - German
  • Senf-Kohl  (Source: Zander Ency) - German
  • senape nera  (Source: Mult Glossary Crops) - Italian
  • kuro-garashi  (Source: F Japan) - Japanese Rōmaji
  • mostarda-preta  (Source: Dict Rehm) - Portuguese
  • mostaza negra  (Source: Dict Rehm) - Spanish
  • svartsenap  (Source: Kulturvaxtdatabas) - Swedish
  • hei jie  (Source: F ChinaEng) - Transcribed Chinese

Economic Importance:

  • Environmental: soil improver
  • Food additives:
  • Medicines: folklore; folklore; source of allyl isothiocyanate; source of allyl isothiocyanate; source of allyl isothiocyanate
  • Vertebrate poisons: mammals
  • Weed: potential seed contaminant

Distributional Range:

    Native

    Africa
    • NORTHERN AFRICA: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia
    • NORTHEAST TROPICAL AFRICA: Eritrea, Ethiopia

    Asia-Temperate
    • WESTERN ASIA: Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey
    • CAUCASUS: Armenia
    • MIDDLE ASIA: Kazakhstan
    • CHINA: China [Gansu Sheng, Jiangsu Sheng, Qinghai Sheng, Xinjiang Uygur Zizhiqu, Xizang Zizhiqu]

    Europe
    • NORTHERN EUROPE: Ireland, United Kingdom
    • MIDDLE EUROPE: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland
    • EASTERN EUROPE: Belarus, Moldova, Russian Federation-European part, [European part (s.)] Ukraine
    • SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece (incl. Crete), Italy (incl. Sardinia, Sicily), Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia
    • SOUTHWESTERN EUROPE: France (incl. Corsica), Spain (n.)


    Cultivated (widely cult.)

    Naturalized

    Africa
    • MACARONESIA: Cape Verde, Portugal, [Azores, Madeira Islands] Spain [Canary Islands]
    • NORTHEAST TROPICAL AFRICA: Ethiopia
    • SOUTHERN AFRICA: South Africa [Mpumalanga]

    Asia-Temperate
    • EASTERN ASIA: Japan

    Asia-Tropical
    • INDO-CHINA: Vietnam

    Australasia
    • AUSTRALIA: Australia
    • NEW ZEALAND: New Zealand

    Europe
    • NORTHERN EUROPE: Denmark, Norway (s.), Sweden (s.)
    • EASTERN EUROPE: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania
    • SOUTHWESTERN EUROPE: Portugal

    Northern America
    • Canada, Mexico, United States

    Pacific
    • NORTH-CENTRAL PACIFIC: United States [Hawaii, United States Minor Outlying Islands]

    Southern America
    • CENTRAL AMERICA: Guatemala
    • WESTERN SOUTH AMERICA: Ecuador, Peru
    • SOUTHERN SOUTH AMERICA: Argentina, Chile


    Other (exact native range obscure)

References:

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Check other web resources for Brassica nigra (L.) W. D. J. Koch :

  • Flora Europaea: Database of European Plants (ESFEDS)
  • Flora of North America: Collaborative Floristic Effort of North American Botanists
  • PLANTS: USDA-NRCS Database of Plants of the United States and its Territories
  • BONAP North American Plant Atlas of the Biota of North America Program:
  • Flora del Conosur: Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares del Conosur
  • Flora of China: Online version from Harvard University
  • AVH: Australia's Virtual Herbarium
  • SIBIS: South African National Biodiversity Institute's (SANBI) Integrated Biodiversity System
  • TROPICOS: Nomenclatural and Specimen Database of the Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Mansfeld: Mansfeld's World Databas of Agricultural and Horticultural Crops
  • ePIC: Electronic Plant Information Centre of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • AGRICOLA: Article Citation Database or NAL Catalog of USDA's National Agricultural Library
  • Entrez: NCBI's search engine for PubMed citations, GenBank sequences, etc.
  • PubAg: USDA's National Agricultural Library database of full-text journal articles and citations on the agricultural sciences.

Images:

  • Seed: U.S. National Seed Herbarium image

Cite as: USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Plant Germplasm System. 2019. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN-Taxonomy).
National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. URL: https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=7666. Accessed 12 December 2019.