Jump to: SynonymsCommon NamesEconomic ImportanceDistributional RangeReferencesOther Web ReferencesImages

Taxon: Prunus spinosa L.

 
Genus: Prunus
Subgenus: Prunus
Section: Prunus
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Amygdaloideae
Tribe: Amygdaleae
Nomen number: 30116
Place of publication: Sp. pl. 1:475. 1753
Link to protologue: https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/358494
Typification: View in Linnean Typification Project
Name Verified on: 15-May-2011 by ARS Systematic Botanists.
Accessions: 51 (22 active, 7 available) in National Plant Germplasm System (Map)

Autonyms (not in current use) and synonyms:

(≡ homotypic synonym, = heterotypic synonym, - autonym)

Common names:

Economic Importance:

  • Environmental: boundary/barrier/support; ornamental; revegetator (for land reclamation)
  • Human food: fruit; fruit
  • Medicines: folklore
  • Vertebrate poisons: mammals

Distributional Range:

    Native

    Asia-Temperate
    • WESTERN ASIA: Iran (n.w.), Turkey
    • CAUCASUS: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Russian Federation, [Dagestan] Russian Federation-Ciscaucasia [Ciscaucasia]

    Europe
    • NORTHERN EUROPE: Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom
    • MIDDLE EUROPE: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland
    • EASTERN EUROPE: Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russian Federation-European part, [European part] Ukraine (incl. Krym)
    • SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE: Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy (incl. Sardinia, Sicily), Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia
    • SOUTHWESTERN EUROPE: France (incl. Corsica), Portugal, Spain (incl. Baleares)


    Cultivated (also cult.)

References:

  1. Afonin, A. N., S. L. Greene, N. I. Dzyubenko, & A. N. Frolov, eds. Interactive agricultural ecological atlas of Russia and neighboring countries. Economic plants and their diseases, pests and weeds (on-line resource). URL: http://www.agroatlas.ru/en/content/related/Prunus_spinosa/ target='_blank'
  2. Aldén, B., S. Ryman, & M. Hjertson. 2012. Svensk Kulturväxtdatabas, SKUD (Swedish Cultivated and Utility Plants Database; online resource) URL: www.skud.info
  3. Aradhya, M. K. et al. 2004. Molecular characterization of variability and relationships among seven cultivated and selected wild species of Prunus L. using amplified fragment length polymorphism. Sci. Hort. 103:131-144. Note: Prunus spinosa grouped with P. domestica, and P. cerasifera
  4. Bouhadida, M. et al. 2009. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of Prunus rootstocks. Sci. Hort. 120:237-245.
  5. Chin, S.-W. et al. 2014. Diversification of almonds, peaches, plums and cherries - Molecular systematics and biogeographic history of Prunus (Rosaceae). Molec. Phylogenet. Evol. 76:34-48.
  6. Cooper, M. R. & A. W. Johnson. 1998. Poisonous plants and fungi in Britain: animal and human poisoning
  7. Davis, P. H., ed. 1965-1988. Flora of Turkey and the east Aegean islands.
  8. Duke, J. A. et al. 2002. CRC Handbook of medicinal herbs
  9. Encke, F. et al. 1984. Zander: Handwörterbuch der Pflanzennamen, 13. Auflage
  10. Encke, F. et al. 1993. Zander: Handwörterbuch der Pflanzennamen, 14. Auflage
  11. Erhardt, W. et al. 2002. Zander: Handwörterbuch der Pflanzennamen, 17. Auflage
  12. Euro+Med Editorial Committee. Euro+Med Plantbase: the information resource for Euro-Mediterranean plant diversity (on-line resource).
  13. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 2010. Ecocrop (on-line resource). URL: http://ecocrop.fao.org/ecocrop/srv/en/cropListDetails?code=&relation=beginsWith&name=Prunus+spinosa&quantity=1 target='_blank'
  14. Gilbert, L. 1998. pers. comm. Note: re. English common names
  15. Hancock, J. F. et al. 2008. Chapter 9. Peaches. Temperate fruit crop breeding: germplasm to genomics 265-298. Note: this review listed Prunus spinosa as one of the species that has been hybridized with P. persica
  16. Hanelt, P., ed. 2001. Mansfeld's encyclopedia of agricultural and horticultural crops. Volumes 1-6 1:518-519.
  17. Hartmann, W. & M. Neumüller. 2009. Plum breeding. Breeding plantation tree crops: temperate species 161-231. Note: this review commented on Prunus spinosa as a tetraploid species probably involved in the origin of P. domestica
  18. Horvath, A. et al. 2011. Phenotypic variability and genetic structure in plum (Prunus domestica L.), cherry plum (P. cerasifera Ehrh.) and sloe (P. spinosa L.). Sci. Hort. 129:283-293.
  19. Huxley, A., ed. 1992. The new Royal Horticultural Society dictionary of gardening
  20. Komarov, V. L. et al., eds. 1934-1964. Flora SSSR.
  21. Liberty Hyde Bailey Hortorium. 1976. Hortus third.
  22. Mabberley, D. J. 1997. The plant-book: a portable dictionary of the vascular plants, ed. 2
  23. Markle, G. M. et al., eds. 1998. Food and feed crops of the United States, ed. 2
  24. McGuffin, M., J. T. Kartesz, A. Y. Leung, & A. O. Tucker. 2000. Herbs of commerce, ed. 2 American Herbal Products Association, Silver Spring, Maryland.
  25. Mehlenbacher, S. A. et al. 1991. Apricots (Prunus). Acta Hort. 290:65-110.
  26. Mohanty, A. et al. 2002. Population genetic analysis of European Prunus spinosa (Rosaceae) using chloroplast DNA markers. Amer. J. Bot. 89:1223-1229.
  27. Mouterde, P. 1966-. Nouvelle flore du Liban et de la Syrie.
  28. Mowrey, B. D. & D. J. Werner. 1990. Phylogenetic relationships among species of Prunus as inferred by isozyme markers. Theor. Appl. Genet. 80:129-133. Note: this study found Prunus spinosa among plum species
  29. Personal Care Products Council. INCI
  30. Porcher, M. H. et al. Searchable World Wide Web Multilingual Multiscript Plant Name Database (MMPND) (on-line resource).
  31. Quézel, P. & S. Santa. 1962-1963. Nouvelle flore de l'Algerie.
  32. Ramming, D. W. & V. Cociu. 1991. Plums (Prunus). Acta Hort. 290:235-290.
  33. Reales, A. et al. 2010. Phylogenetics of Eurasian plums, Prunus L. section Prunus (Rosaceae), according to coding and non-coding chloroplast DNA sequences. Tree Genet. Genomes 6:37-45.
  34. Rechinger, K. H., ed. 1963-. Flora iranica.
  35. Rehm, S. 1994. Multilingual dictionary of agronomic plants
  36. Rohrer, J. R. 2011. Prunus (Rosaceae). Flora of North America. 9: in press.
  37. Steyermark, J. A. 1977. Flora of Missouri. Note: introduced
  38. Tutin, T. G. et al., eds. 1964-1980. Flora europaea.
  39. Uphof, J. C. T. 1968. Dictionary of economic plants, ed. 2.
  40. Walters, S. M. et al., eds. 1986-2000. European garden flora.
  41. Wu Zheng-yi & P. H. Raven et al., eds. 1994-. Flora of China (English edition).

Check other web resources for Prunus spinosa L. :

  • Flora Europaea: Database of European Plants (ESFEDS)
  • Flora of North America: Collaborative Floristic Effort of North American Botanists
  • Flora of China: Online version from Harvard University
  • Mansfeld: Mansfeld's World Databas of Agricultural and Horticultural Crops
  • ePIC: Electronic Plant Information Centre of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • AGRICOLA: Article Citation Database or NAL Catalog of USDA's National Agricultural Library
  • Entrez: NCBI's search engine for PubMed citations, GenBank sequences, etc.
  • PubAg: USDA's National Agricultural Library database of full-text journal articles and citations on the agricultural sciences.

Images:

  • Fruit: U.S. National Seed Herbarium image

Cite as: USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Plant Germplasm System. 2019. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN-Taxonomy).
National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. URL: https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=30116. Accessed 18 November 2019.