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Taxon: Brassica napus L.

 
Genus: Brassica
Family: Brassicaceae (alt.Cruciferae)
Tribe: Brassiceae
Nomen number: 7661
Place of publication: Sp. pl. 2:666. 1753
Link to protologue:
Typification: View in Linnean Typification Project
Name Verified on: 24-Feb-2010 by ARS Systematic Botanists. Last Changed: 24-Feb-2010
Species priority site is: North Central Regional PI Station (NC7)
Accessions: 682 (595 active, 374 available) in National Plant Germplasm System (GoogleMap)

Common names:

  • rape  (Source: BSBI) - English
  • seiyō-aburana  (Source: F Japan) - Japanese Rōmaji
  • raps  (Source: Kulturvaxtdatabas) - Swedish
  • ou zhou you cai  (Source: F ChinaEng) - Transcribed Chinese

Economic Importance:

  • Weed: potential seed contaminant; potential seed contaminant

Distributional Range:

    Cultivated

    Africa
    • NORTHEAST TROPICAL AFRICA: Ethiopia
    • EAST TROPICAL AFRICA: Kenya, Tanzania
    • WEST TROPICAL AFRICA: Mali
    • SOUTH TROPICAL AFRICA: Zimbabwe

    Asia-Temperate
    • WESTERN ASIA: Afghanistan, Iran
    • SIBERIA: Russian Federation-Eastern Siberia, [Eastern Siberia] Russian Federation-Western Siberia [Western Siberia]
    • MIDDLE ASIA: Kazakhstan (n.)
    • RUSSIAN FAR EAST: Russian Federation-Far East [Far East]
    • CHINA: China
    • EASTERN ASIA: Japan

    Asia-Tropical
    • INDIAN SUBCONTINENT: India, Pakistan

    Australasia
    • AUSTRALIA: Australia
    • NEW ZEALAND: New Zealand

    Europe
    • Europe

    Northern America
    • Canada, Mexico, United States

    Southern America
    • CENTRAL AMERICA: Central America
    • South America


    Naturalized

    Asia-Temperate
    • WESTERN ASIA: Afghanistan
    • CHINA: China
    • EASTERN ASIA: Japan

    Australasia
    • AUSTRALIA: Australia
    • NEW ZEALAND: New Zealand

    Europe
    • Europe

    Northern America
    • Canada, Mexico, United States

    Southern America
    • CENTRAL AMERICA: Central America
    • WESTERN SOUTH AMERICA: Ecuador [Galapagos Islands]
    • SOUTHERN SOUTH AMERICA: Argentina, Chile


    Other (probable origin in cult.)

References:

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  3. Afonin, A. N., S. L. Greene, N. I. Dzyubenko, & A. N. Frolov, eds. Interactive agricultural ecological atlas of Russia and neighboring countries. Economic plants and their diseases, pests and weeds (on-line resource). (AgroAtlas)
  4. Aldén, B., S. Ryman, & M. Hjertson Svensk Kulturväxtdatabas, SKUD (Swedish Cultivated and Utility Plants Database; online resource on www.skud.info). 2012 (Kulturvaxtdatabas)
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  7. Chen, B.-Y. & W. K. Heneen 1989. Resynthesized Brassica napus L.: A review of its potential in breeding and genetic analysis Hereditas (Beijing) 111:255-263.
  8. Chen, H.-F. et al. 2007. Production and genetic analysis of partial hybrids in intertribal crosses between Brassica species (B. rapa, B. napus) and Capsella bursa-pastoris Pl. Cell Rep. 26:1791-1800.
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  10. Chrungu, B. et al. 1999. Production and characterization of interspecific hybrids between Brassica maurorum and crop brassicas Theor. Appl. Genet. 98:608-613.
  11. CIBA-GEIGY, Basel, Switzerland Documenta CIBA-GEIGY (Grass weeds 1. 1980, 2. 1981; Monocot weeds 3. 1982; Dicot weeds 1. 1988) (Weed CIBA)
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Check other web resources for Brassica napus L. :


Cite as: USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Plant Germplasm System. 2018. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN-Taxonomy).
National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. URL: https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=7661. Accessed 12 December 2018.