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Taxon: Brassica rapa L.

 
Genus: Brassica
Family: Brassicaceae (alt.Cruciferae)
Tribe: Brassiceae
Nomen number: 7685
Place of publication: Sp. pl. 2:666. 1753
Link to protologue:
Comment: includes miscellaneous groups not included elsewhere (in subspecies)
Typification: View in Linnean Typification Project
Name Verified on: 02-Jun-2010 by ARS Systematic Botanists.
Accessions: 763 (600 active, 530 available) in National Plant Germplasm System (Map)

Common names:

Economic Importance:

  • Human food: vegetable (for miscellaneous groups not included elsewhere)
  • Vertebrate poisons: mammals; mammals

Distributional Range:

    Cultivated (widely cult.)

    Adventive

    Africa
    • NORTHEAST TROPICAL AFRICA: Eritrea, Ethiopia
    • EAST TROPICAL AFRICA: Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda
    • SOUTH TROPICAL AFRICA: Mozambique, Zimbabwe

    Asia-Tropical
    • INDIAN SUBCONTINENT: India, Pakistan

    Southern America
    • CARIBBEAN: Barbados, Guadeloupe, Martinique
    • BRAZIL: Brazil


    Naturalized

    Africa
    • NORTHERN AFRICA: Algeria, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia
    • SOUTHERN AFRICA: South Africa

    Asia-Temperate
    • CAUCASUS: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Russian Federation, [Dagestan] Russian Federation-Ciscaucasia [Ciscaucasia]
    • SIBERIA: Russian Federation-Eastern Siberia, [Eastern Siberia] Russian Federation-Western Siberia [Western Siberia]
    • MIDDLE ASIA: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan
    • MONGOLIA: Mongolia
    • RUSSIAN FAR EAST: Russian Federation-Far East [Far East]

    Australasia
    • AUSTRALIA: Australia
    • NEW ZEALAND: New Zealand

    Europe
    • NORTHERN EUROPE: Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom
    • MIDDLE EUROPE: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland
    • EASTERN EUROPE: Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russian Federation-European part, [European part] Ukraine (incl. Krym)
    • SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy (incl. Sardinia, Sicily), Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia
    • SOUTHWESTERN EUROPE: France (s.), Spain (incl. Baleares)

    Northern America
    • Canada, Mexico, United States

    Pacific
    • NORTH-CENTRAL PACIFIC: United States [Hawaii]
    • SOUTHWESTERN PACIFIC: New Caledonia

    Southern America
    • CARIBBEAN: Hispaniola
    • CENTRAL AMERICA: Nicaragua
    • WESTERN SOUTH AMERICA: Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru
    • SOUTHERN SOUTH AMERICA: Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, [Alto Paraguay] Uruguay


    Other (widespread weed, probable origin Eurasia)

References:

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Check other web resources for Brassica rapa L. :

Images:

  • Seed: U.S. National Seed Herbarium image

Cite as: USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Plant Germplasm System. 2019. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN-Taxonomy).
National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. URL: https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=7685. Accessed 17 September 2019.